Monday, August 4, 2014

Insurance Industry, Consumers Join Forces to Fight High Prices of Specialty Drugs

Here’s the next salvo in the back and forth between insurers and the drug industry over drug prices: the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America are pushing the Department of Health and Human Services to take action to protect consumers who have gained insurance via the health law’s online marketplaces from high, out-of-pocket costs for specialty drugs.
Specialty drugs are most often prescribed for complex, chronic and often costly health conditions like rheumatoid arthritis and hepatitis C that require continuous monitoring by a health care provider.
At a June 11 press event, PhRMA, the drug industry’s trade association, and five patient advocacy groups, ranging from the Colon Cancer Alliance to the Immune Deficiency Foundation, pointed to an analysis by the consulting firm Avalere Health — commissioned by PhRMA — as reason for worry regarding these medicines.
Avalere Study Did Not Include Medicare Part D Drug Plans; May Impact Costs
The analysis by Avalere Health found that the vast majority of plans in the Health Insurance Exchanges require relatively high cost sharing for all medicines in at least one class. The study did not include Medicare Part D plans but did include Medicaid managed care plans.
But, can increase costs in Medicare, says the Campaign for Sustainable Rx Pricing:
“The issue of higher cost drugs, especially “specialty drugs”, is only going to become more critical to deal with in the coming years. One estimate notes that by 2020, spending on specialty drugs will quadruple from $87 billion to more than $400 billion. This continued growth in spending will put significant upward pressure on premiums in the private marketplace as well as in public programs like Medicare.”
The Avalere study examined 123 formularies from silver-level exchange plans — the benchmark plan that will generally pay 70 percent of covered medical expenses, leaving the consumer responsible for 30 percent  – and found that a fifth of them required cost sharing of 40 percent or more for certain classes of specialty drugs used to treat HIV/AIDS, multiple sclerosis, bipolar disorder, cancer and other illnesses.
Avalere also concluded that 60 percent of silver plan formularies placed all medications for multiple sclerosis, Crohn’s disease, cancer and other illnesses in the plan’s highest formulary tier. That means patients who need these medicines would face the highest coinsurance percentage.
PhRMA President John Castellani called on HHS to limit insurers’ ability to structure drug coverage in a way that subjects patients with these types of chronic and severe illnesses from these type of high out-of-pocket costs. To continue reading click here.
By Lisa Gillespie, Kaiser Health News

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