Monday, November 30, 2015

Specialty drugs in the pipeline: 4 heavily impacted diseases

At the Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy Conference Nexus 2015 in Orlando, Florida, Aimee Tharaldson, PharmD, a senior clinical consultant in emerging therapeutics at Express Script, presented a session “Specialty Pharmaceuticals in Development."

During the session, held on October 27, Tharaldson identified several specialty medications that are likely to be approved in 2016, and she spoke about how those medications could affect the managed care pharmacy industry.
[Click to Enlarge]
Here's a closer look at four diseases and conditions that Tharaldson says are likely to be heavily impacted by newly approved specialty medications in late 2015 and 2016.

1. Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSLC)

Genentech’s alectinib is an oral ALK inhibitor that is expected to be approved by March 4, 2016, for the treatment of ALK+ NSCLC who have progressed on, or are intolerant to, crizotinib (I would use generic name here). It will compete with Novartis’ Zykadia in this patient population.

AstraZeneca’s osimertinib and Clovis Oncology’s rociletinib are oral epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors that are expected to be approved by February 2016 and March 30, 2016, respectively. They are pending approval for the treatment of EGFR and T790M mutation-positive NSCLC.

2. Multiple Myeloma

Bristol-Myers Squibb and AbbVie’s Empliciti (elotuzumab) is a biologic drug that may be approved by March 1, 2016, for use in combination with Revlimid (lenalidomide) and dexamethasone to treat relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma.

Janssen’s daratumumab is another biologic drug that could be initially approved by March 9, 2016, as monotherapy to treat patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma.

Takeda’s ixazomib citrate is the first oral proteasome inhibitor that may be approved by March 10, 2016, to treat relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma in combination with Revlimid and dexamethasone (all-oral regimen).

3. Severe Asthma

GlaxoSmithKline’s Nucala (mepolizumab) is an interleukin-5 inhibitor that expected to be approved by November 4, 2015, for the treatment of patients with severe eosinophilic asthma.

Teva’s reslizumab is another interleukin-5 inhibitor that is expected to be approved by March 30, 2016, for severe eosinophilic asthma.

4. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD)

BioMarin’s drisapersen is expected to be approved by December 27, 2015, for the treatment of DMD amenable to exon 51 skipping. Sarepta Therapeutic’s eteplirsen is expected to be approved by February 26, 2016, for the treatment of DMD amenable to exon 51 skipping. Both drugs treat the underlying cause of DMD by allowing the production of a functional dystrophin protein.

There are approximately 20,000 boys in the U.S. with DMD. This rare disease is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, resulting in the absence or defect of the dystrophin protein. Patients experience progressive loss of muscle function, often making them wheelchair bound before the age of 12.

Respiratory and cardiac muscle can also be affected by the disease. Few patients survived past the age of 30. Up to 13% of boys with DMD have dystrophin gene mutations/deletions amendable to an exon 51 skip. Approximately 2,600 boys in the U.S. have DMD with exon 51 skip. These drugs may cost approximately $300,000 per year.

by Aubrey Westgate

No comments:

Post a Comment